We’ve Come A Long Way Since 1907! #UPWEEK Blog Tour

Follow Fordham Press’s board We've Come A Long Way Since 1907! #UPWEEK on Pinterest.

The University Press Week blog tour continues today at Indiana University Press, Stanford University Press, Johns Hopkins University Press, and University Press of Florida. Follow the conversation on Twitter with hashtag #upweek.

Follow Fordham Press’s board We've Come A Long Way Since 1907! #UPWEEK on Pinterest. The University Press Week blog tour continues today at Indiana University Press, Stanford University Press, Johns Hopkins University Press, and University Press of Florida. Follow the … Full Story

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NYT Bookshelf: From a Nickel to a Token


N.Y. / REGION

A History Built on Culture, and Transport
Looking Back at New York City Culture and Transit
Bookshelf | by Sam Roberts

Last month’s death of William J. Ronan, the first chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, is reason enough to reflect on the history of public transit through From a Nickel to a Token: The Journey From Board of Transportation to MTA (Fordham University Press), by Andrew J. Sparberg.

Mr. Sparberg traces nearly three decades at the dawn of public ownership, from the city’s acquisition and unification of the subway system, to the demolition of the elevated lines, to the replacement of trolleys by buses, to the elimination of the politically sacrosanct nickel fare and the first air-conditioned subways.

READ MORE…

N.Y. / REGION A History Built on Culture, and Transport Looking Back at New York City Culture and Transit Bookshelf | by Sam Roberts Last month’s death of William J. Ronan, the first chairman of the Metropolitan Transportation Authority, is … Full Story

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Gothic: Halloween Summed Up in a Single Writing Style

“Scare Tactics is that rare academic work that’s accessible rather than purposefully opaque, and it has much to offer readers interested in American literature, gothic fiction, or uppity women.”—Bitch Magazine

The notion of “the Gothic” permeates our society’s art forms, conveying the darkest of possible tones. It is this sense of discomfort, this sudden acquaintance with the disturbing and the uncanny, which draws us towards this type of literature time and time again.

Scare Tactics, written by Jeffrey Andrew Weinstock, explores the women authors who contributed to this strangely intriguing literary field. Between the end of the Civil War and roughly 1930, hundreds of uncanny tales were published by women in the periodical press and in books. These include stories by familiar figures such as Edith Wharton, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, as well as by authors almost wholly unknown to twenty-first-century readers, such as Josephine Dodge Bacon, Alice Brown, Emma Frances Dawson, and Harriet Prescott Spofford. Focusing on this tradition of female writing offers a corrective to the prevailing belief within American literary scholarship that the uncanny tale, exemplified by the literary productions of Irving, Poe, and Hawthorne, was displaced after the Civil War by literary realism.

To read Chapter 1, “The Ghost in the Parlor: Harriet Prescott Spofford, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Anna M. Hoyt, and Edith Wharton”, click here.

Visit our Halloween 2014 Pinterest page: Costumes, Cobwebs, Candy, & Books…

“Scare Tactics is that rare academic work that’s accessible rather than purposefully opaque, and it has much to offer readers interested in American literature, gothic fiction, or uppity women.”—Bitch Magazine The notion of “the Gothic” permeates our society’s art forms, … Full Story

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Jacques Derrida’s Cat

Jacques Derrida’s Cat
On discovering one is being looked-at, rather than looking-at

Jacques Derrida in his book, The Animal That Therefore I Am, discusses the expectation before him to talk about animals, but, instead of “talking about”, and instead of describing animal as a generality, or even as an assortment of species, he describes an incident, a specific moment with a singular and real cat, with his cat, Logos. He described a moment of being naked in the presence of this cat, with the cat looking at him. He described a sense, of discomfort, even shame from this experience of having his naked body gazed upon by his cat. Derrida saw that he was not so much looking as he was being looked at, and not by some global category of “animal”, but by an all-too-present, staring feline.

Derrida continues, always returning to the cat, his cat, the specific cat staring at his naked body. He reminds us that the experience of being looked upon by an animal is almost never the vantage point from which animals are talked about in both science and philosophy.Instead, the gaze is repeatedly and consistently from the human eyes upon the body of the animal. We, the humans (and in particular, we the philosophers, the scientists, and other institutional players) are the observers, and from the position of looking upon the animal we also find ourselves with the privilege of being the ones who name, who examine, and who interpret the animal. The scientific and philisophical eye never expects the animal to be examining the examiner.

[This review was originally posted by Christopher Kinman on his blog.]

For more on Jaques Derrida, visit The French Thinkers Collection by Combined Academic Publications.

Jacques Derrida’s Cat On discovering one is being looked-at, rather than looking-at Jacques Derrida in his book, The Animal That Therefore I Am, discusses the expectation before him to talk about animals, but, instead of “talking about”, and instead of describing animal … Full Story

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The New York Times Reviews COOL

A Look at Our Love Affair With Air-Conditioning
by Sam Roberts | NYT Bookshelf
SEPT. 19, 2014

With summer just about officially over, we can dispassionately explore what the world was like a little more than a century ago, before Willis Carrier installed his “apparatus for treating air” in a Williamsburg, Brooklyn, printing plant.

“I live in New York, a city that doesn’t exist without air-conditioning,” Salvatore Basile writes in “Cool: How Air Conditioning Changed Everything” (Fordham University Press).

To Americans, New York is a Northern city, but in his breezily anecdotal book, Mr. Basile reminds readers that we practically share a latitude with Madrid, if not the siestas. The heat could be brutal, particularly when 5,000 ceiling fans, while the largest such installation in the world, were all that cooled the city’s subway cars.

Air-conditioning was not just about comfort.

It triggered a cultural and demographic revolution.

It made windowless offices, work and retail spaces and entertainment venues possible (and also permitted the introduction of heat-generating computers).

It also diminished street life.

And beyond New York, it made living in the Sun Belt bearable, shifting not only jobs and population there, but also political power.

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A Look at Our Love Affair With Air-Conditioning by Sam Roberts | NYT Bookshelf SEPT. 19, 2014 With summer just about officially over, we can dispassionately explore what the world was like a little more than a century ago, before … Full Story

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