Winner of the John Nicholas Brown Prize

The Medieval Academy of America has announced that Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500, by Karl Shoemaker is the winner of the 2015 John Nicholas Brown Prize!

Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500 traces convincingly, with nuance and acuity, the institution of sanctuary for well over a thousand years—from late pagan Rome to Henry VIII. He successfully challenges the prevailing assumption that sanctuary was primarily a necessary societal response to weak political order, as well as the erroneous impression that its demise in early modern England reflected the era’s anti-papism. Shoemaker’s sweeping overview is richly embellished with engaging narrative detail and provides an original, compelling, and above all convincing account of the evolution of criminal justice in the Western legal tradition over the entire medieval period.

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The Medieval Academy of America has announced that Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500, by Karl Shoemaker is the winner of the 2015 John Nicholas Brown Prize! Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500 traces convincingly, with … Full Story

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Dublin Review of Books: The Sons of Molly Maguire

‘THEM POOR IRISH LADS’ IN PENNSYLVANIA
Breandán Mac Suibhne

The Sons of Molly Maguire: The Irish Roots of America’s First Labor War, by Mark Bulik,Fordham University Press, 352 pp, ISBN 978-0823262236

Indade I do, sir. Will I ever forget it! A sad day it was in the hard coalfields, sir. When the hour of the hangings arrived for them poor Irish lads, the world suddenly became dark and we had to burn our lamps. It’s Black Thursday it was, sir.

The response of an elderly miner’s widow in Pennsylvania, when asked by folklorist George Korson in the 1930s if she remembered the hanging of the first batch of Molly Maguires in June 1877.

… among the McGeehan clan in County Donegal, the story is still recounted of the family’s gathering around the kitchen table on that day in 1877. Hugh McGeehan had written them of his innocence and asked them to pray for him. And, so the story

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‘THEM POOR IRISH LADS’ IN PENNSYLVANIA Breandán Mac Suibhne The Sons of Molly Maguire: The Irish Roots of America’s First Labor War, by Mark Bulik,Fordham University Press, 352 pp, ISBN 978-0823262236 Indade I do, sir. Will I ever forget it! … Full Story

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After Fukushima

Today marks the 4th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Following a major earthquake, a 15-meter tsunami disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. All three cores largely melted in the first three days.

In After Fukushima: The Equivalence of Catastrophes, the philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy examines the nature of catastrophes in the era of globalization and technology. Can a catastrophe be an isolated occurrence? Is there such a thing as a “natural” catastrophe when all of our technologies—nuclear energy, power supply, water supply—are necessarily implicated, drawing together the biological, social, economic, and political? Nancy examines these questions and more. Exclusive to this English edition are two interviews with Nancy conducted by Danielle Cohen-Levinas and Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki.

Visit DigitalResearch@Fordham to download the Table of Contents and Introduction to After Fukushima: The Equivalence of Catastrophes.

Today marks the 4th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Following a major earthquake, a 15-meter tsunami disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. All three cores … Full Story

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Interview with Tom Glynn, author of Reading Publics

The Author’s Corner with Tom Glynn

Tom Glynn is Anglo-American History and Political Science Selector in the Alexander Library at Rutgers University Libraries. This interview is based on his new book, Reading Publics: New York City’s Public Libraries, 1754-1911 (Fordham University Press, January 2015).

JF: What led you to write Reading Publics?

TG: I came to the history of American libraries by way of American labor history. My first article was on the Apprentices’ Library of the City of New York. That led to research on other libraries in the city in the nineteenth century and prompted me to explore what they held in common, what goals and values the Apprentices’ Library shared with, for example, the Mercantile Library Association, a library for young clerks. The book really began to take shape when I started to think about the contemporary use of the term public library to refer to these privately funded, privately managed institutions.

JF: In two sentences, what is the argument of Reading Publics?

TG: The early history of public libraries in New York City is an important part of the social and cultural history of the United States, revealing critical shifts in how Americans defined the public, the public good, and public institutions. It is also an important part of the history of books and reading, shedding light on the relationship between the market and culture, the reception of popular fiction, and class and gender in the construction of the reader.

JF: Why do we need to read Reading Publics?

TG: Histories of public libraries in the United States omit or gloss over the fact that the meaning of the term changed over time, that public library meant something quite different to a reader in 1754 than to a reader in 1911. Reading my book you will appreciate the shifts from the eighteenth to the twentieth century in how Americans defined and what they expected of public institutions and what was valued as a public good. You will also learn about the history of books and reading in America and how class, gender and the market shaped the construction of the reader. Reading Publics addresses the need to place the development of public libraries within the larger context of American social and cultural history. But it is also a New York story, an accessible, interesting narrative of a little-know aspect of the city’s past. It was written not just for scholars, but for anyone interested in history, books, and libraries.

JF: When and why did you decide to become an American historian?

TG: I became a librarian before I became an historian. After I started my first job in an academic library, I joined a Ph.D. program, in part for the challenge and in part to be a better librarian. Later I wrote a book on the history of early public libraries in New York City for essentially the same reasons.

JF: What is your next project?

TG: I’m not sure. I’m very interested in the history of reading and also in detective fiction in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. It would be fun to find something that combines those interests.

JF: Sounds good, thanks Tom!

Posted Thursday, February 12, 2015 by John Fea at  The Author’s Corner 

The Author’s Corner with Tom Glynn Tom Glynn is Anglo-American History and Political Science Selector in the Alexander Library at Rutgers University Libraries. This interview is based on his new book, Reading Publics: New York City’s Public Libraries, 1754-1911 (Fordham University Press, January 2015). JF: What … Full Story

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