FUP Announces New International Distribution Partnership

NEW YORK – We are pleased to announce that Combined Academic Publishers (CAP) is now distributing Fordham University Press (FUP) books in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Combined Academic Publishers is Europe’s leading distributor of North American university presses.

CAP offers specialist academic sales, marketing and distribution covering Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Fordham University Press will work with CAP to further expand our reach in these important international markets.

Fordham University Press publishes primarily in the humanities and the social sciences, with an emphasis on the fields of anthropology, philosophy, theology, history, classics, communications, economics, sociology, business, political science, and law, as well as literature and the fine arts.

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  • Click here to view the latest Fordham University Press catalogue.

Twitter: @FordhamPress

  • Click here to find a full list of all the university presses represented by CAP Ltd and catalogues

Twitter: @CAP_Ltd

NEW YORK – We are pleased to announce that Combined Academic Publishers (CAP) is now distributing Fordham University Press (FUP) books in Europe, the Middle East and Africa. Combined Academic Publishers is Europe’s leading distributor of North American university presses. … Full Story

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Leadership is an Evolving Skill

By Fredric Nachbaur

Fredric Nachbaur, Director, FUP

During the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) annual meeting that took place this past June in Chicago there were so many good sessions that I was hard pressed to choose the ones that would be most beneficial, especially if they were overlapping . One such session I attended was called “So You Want to Be a Director? Leadership Strategies for New and Aspiring Directors from the Director’s Tool Kit.” At first, I thought that I didn’t really need to go to this panel but after further reflection I decided that I could learn a thing or two. . . Good move! It was actually very useful and made me think about the offsite meeting I was planning for the staff of Fordham University Press.

Here are a few snippets from Cynthia Barnes, Associate Professor in the Master of Science in Organization Leadership (MSOL) Program, School of Management of Regis University, who kicked off the panel session:

• Micromanaging equals insecurity
• Managers should oversee climate control and obstacle removal – make staff want to come to work and make a contribution
• Acknowledge and recognize employees
• Managers should be comfortable in their own skin

Cynthia’s Five Tips for Managers:
1. Know the right questions to ask and whom to ask – a manager doesn’t have all the answers
2. It’s not about prestige and power – give people power
3. It’s not about control but empowerment – lead people to control themselves
4. Trust others as they are – gifted and talented human beings; find out what floats their boat and reinforce them for that
5. Match tasks with talents – be a door opener

I think those are good tips and a good message to share with my staff. I want them to be doing a job that they like and matches their talents. We should absolutely never say “I do it this way because that the way it’s always been done.” No! If something doesn’t work or needs updating, we should all feel empowered to suggest change. We are fortunate to have an administration that supports our mission and university press publishing. Let’s continue to make them as well as ourselves proud.

Here are brief summaries of the presentations by the directors of three university presses of different sizes:

Alison Mudditt/University of California Press
• People support what they help create
• Make some decisions on your own
• Don’t create an us versus them environment regarding administration
• Can’t run entire press – don’t have the time
• Create environment for success
• Hire and mentor right people
• Senior management team – bring in development program
• Manage external constituencies: Admin, faculty, media, advisory board
• Build Productive relationships with administration
• Realize that you are sending a message – every move and word scrutinized
• Be excited and energized by change; preparedness to make difficult decisions
• Set out expectations and create collaboration
• Hired an organizational consultant – press therapist; 50% paid by administration

Jane Hoehner, Wayne State Press

• Learning as you go
• Be yourself but adapt to your audience
• Talk to departments, students, rotary club
• Communicate
• Risk taker
• Transparencies with staff but keep some stuff back. Create a balance

Charles Watkinson, Purdue University Press

Solve problems together
1. All have the big picture
2. Take advantage of university and align with its mission
3. Manage up

Even though each of the above presses is different in size and publishing program, their challenges are the same. They each need to create an atmosphere that encourages productivity and pride and publish high quality scholarship that mirrors the mission of its parent university while contending with an ever-changing landscape. I’m glad to know that I’m not alone and that I have colleagues that I can turn to for sound advice. Academic publishing has its ups and downs but I’m proud to be part of it and looking forward to leading Fordham University Press into the next stage.

Fredric Nachbaur (Twitter: @FNachbaur) is the Director of Fordham University Press.

 

By Fredric Nachbaur During the Association of American University Presses (AAUP) annual meeting that took place this past June in Chicago there were so many good sessions that I was hard pressed to choose the ones that would be most … Full Story

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2012 FUP Retreat

Self-reflection is part of every good organization. With an eye to the future, FUP held its first ever retreat. The Press met at Fordham Westchester to review the way the Press has grown and changed, as well as brainstorm what is and will be necessary to continue publishing strong scholarly works in a rapidly changing environment. We also discussed ways to align our publishing program to support the university’s overarching mission. One of the key areas we focused on was the advancement of scholarship through globalization.

We reviewed our internal structures to ensure that we are using the technologies already in place to our very best advantage, and to determine short and long term areas for investment and improvement. One large scale change on the University level that the Press is eagerly anticipating is the email migration to Gmail. With increased functionality for scheduling meetings this is one change that will not be difficult to make. In addition, FUP is excited to kick off the launch of our new website this summer. With a user-friendly interface and enhanced search functionality, we are certain that scholars and readers will be able to find what they are looking for with ease. (Stay tuned for more information in the coming weeks!)

Helping to support the mission,our staff continues to grow and expand. This year our editorial program took on a new summer intern, Brian Earl. Brian, a student at Northwestern University, will be assisting the Editorial Director, Helen Tartar and her assistant, Tom Lay, in transmitting manuscripts, acquiring permissions, and creating book plans. Stephen Gan, a Fordham junior also joins the staff to aid in the daily processes of the Press with Fordham senior, Ben Sicker. With interns changing from one academic year to the next, and the continually changing publishing landscape, we are forced to revisit and rethink our daily routines and overall strategies.

Coincidentally, our Fall 2012 list touches on this concept as well. The Sentimental Touch: The Language of Feeling in the Age of Managerialism by Aaron Ritzenberg touches on managerial capitalism in the United States. He points out that most powerful businesses ceased to be family owned. Instead they became sprawling organizations controlled by complex bureaucracies. Sentimental literature—work written specifically to convey and inspire deep feeling—does not seem to fit with a swiftly bureaucratizing society. Surprisingly though, sentimental language has persisted in American literature, even as a culture of managed systems threatened to obscure the power of individual affect.

Although this retreat was an exercise in management systems, we strive to take a very human approach. With a smaller workforce that is deeply interconnected, we are made up of individuals that have deep feelings about their work. No amount of management can strike that out. But then again, that is why we are publishers—the maker of books—the gatekeepers of ideas.

Self-reflection is part of every good organization. With an eye to the future, FUP held its first ever retreat. The Press met at Fordham Westchester to review the way the Press has grown and changed, as well as brainstorm what … Full Story

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