COMPARATIVE MODERNISMS, MEDIALITIES, MODERNITIES


New York University
NYU Silver Center
Jurow Hall, 1st floor
100 Washington Square East
NYC

May 4-5,  9:30am-7:30pm

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Conference sponsored by Fordham University’s Comparative Literature Program, New York University’s Comparative Literature Department, Fordham University Press and the consortium of presses participating in the Modern Language Initiative. Funding generously provided by the Mellon-funded Modern Language Initiative and Fordham University Arts & Sciences Deans.

 

For information, visit www.modernlanguageinitiative.com

New York University NYU Silver Center Jurow Hall, 1st floor 100 Washington Square East NYC May 4-5,  9:30am-7:30pm ____________________________________________________________________________________ Conference sponsored by Fordham University’s Comparative Literature Program, New York University’s Comparative Literature Department, Fordham University Press and the consortium of … Full Story

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The End of an Era

The recent death of Maersk McKinney Moller a few days shy of his 99th birthday calls attention to the fact that the Moller family, of Denmark, established and continues to control what quickly became the largest merchant shipping company the world has ever seen. Founded in the early years of the 20th century, the company would not become the colossus it is today until the onset of containerized cargo transport in the final decades of the century.

In 1999, Maersk purchased the American company, Sea-Land Services, that had pioneered the concept of carrying cargo in containers in the late 1950s and today Maersk Lines, as the shipping company is generally known, operates more vessels than its three largest competitors combined.

The late Maersk McKinney Moller headed the A.P Moller-Maersk Group as CEO from 1965 until 1993, and then continued to serve as Chairman until 2003. The corporation’s headquarters are in a magnificent building along the Copenhagen waterfront, just a short walk from the famous state of the Little Mermaid, a fictional character created by another famous resident of Copenhagen, Hans Christian Andersen.

By Brian Cudahy, author of Box Boats: How Container Ships Changed the World

The recent death of Maersk McKinney Moller a few days shy of his 99th birthday calls attention to the fact that the Moller family, of Denmark, established and continues to control what quickly became the largest merchant shipping company the … Full Story

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Library Journal Review

 

Library JournalHidden: Reflections on Gay Life, AIDS, and Spiritual Desire

By Richard Giannone

In this brief but expressive memoir, Giannone (English, emeritus, Fordham Univ.; Flannery O’Connor: Hermit Novelist) discusses his experiences as a closeted gay man, a Roman Catholic, an academic, and a caregiver. In large part about difficulty and pain, this is a work that resists easy or tidy conclusions. While caring for ailing female relations, Giannone rediscovered a spirituality inspired in part by the desert fathers and mothers of the third century and in part by his scholarly work on Flannery O’Connor. Although more of a life story than a reflective or spiritual autobiography, his work captures two important historical points: the impact of AIDS on gay life and the experience of baby boomers as caregivers. VERDICT Although Giannone does not fully integrate his difficult experiences into a cohesive work or really succeed in seeing them as aspects of larger forces, his memoir will be of interest to social historians and many gay and lesbian readers.


Published 3/1/12

  Hidden: Reflections on Gay Life, AIDS, and Spiritual Desire By Richard Giannone In this brief but expressive memoir, Giannone (English, emeritus, Fordham Univ.; Flannery O’Connor: Hermit Novelist) discusses his experiences as a closeted gay man, a Roman Catholic, an … Full Story

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