Civil Rights in New York City

The New York Times spotlights Clarence Taylor’s new book, Civil Rights in New York City: From World War II to the Giuliani Era.

While the nation’s attention was riveted on the South, much of the civil rights revolution in the second half of the 20th century was being waged in the North. Civil Rights in New York City: From World War II to the Giuliani Era (Fordham University Press, $35) attempts to provide some balance through 10 academic essays that cast light on struggles between blacks and organized labor, civil rights and the cold war, discrimination that extended even to garbage collection, and the competing visions of Mayors David N. Dinkins and Rudolph W. Giuliani. READ MORE

The New York Times spotlights Clarence Taylor’s new book, Civil Rights in New York City: From World War II to the Giuliani Era. While the nation’s attention was riveted on the South, much of the civil rights revolution in the … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...

Selling to Libraries: The New eBook Aggregation Options

2011 AAUP Meeting, Baltimore, MD

Faced with shrinking budgets and limited space, libraries seek new ways to acquire the books their patrons want and need. Publishers must figure out a tenable model to meet this demand. Several new aggregators have emerged to offer collections of university press e-books on highly functional platforms to the library market. How should presses decide among these new options? Which ones will libraries choose to buy? What’s the difference between subscription and perpetual access? What do libraries want, and how can presses provide it in a way that supports their own sustainability? A librarian from a major university and representatives from Project MUSE/UPCC, JSTOR, Oxford Scholarship Online, and Cambridge Books Online answered questions and provided backup as Fredric Nachbaur, Director, Fordham University Press, gave a comparative overview of the new aggregation options now available for scholarly monographs.

2011 AAUP Meeting, Baltimore, MD Faced with shrinking budgets and limited space, libraries seek new ways to acquire the books their patrons want and need. Publishers must figure out a tenable model to meet this demand. Several new aggregators have … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...

Debating the Humanities

2011 AAUP Meeting, Baltimore, MD

Rising tuition fees, falling endowments, an exodus of undergraduate students to pre-professional majors, and a spate of recent books critical of the liberal arts professoriate — such developments have raised questions about the value of the humanities as taught in U.S. universities. Cost-conscious institutions have responded by cutting budgets and tenure-track positions in core humanities departments. In this lively, debate-style forum, three distinguished academic guests addressed the current crisis — if indeed it is a crisis — from very different points of view. Ohio State’s Frank J. Donoghue, Pomona College’s Kathleen Fitzpatrick, and the Institute for the Future of the Book’s Bob Stein, specifically considered the role of university press publishing in the future of the humanities, and the role of the humanities in the future of the university press. Will either survive the 21st century and if so, as Shakespeare might have asked, how will it?

AAUP 2011: Debating the Humanities

2011 AAUP Meeting, Baltimore, MD Rising tuition fees, falling endowments, an exodus of undergraduate students to pre-professional majors, and a spate of recent books critical of the liberal arts professoriate — such developments have raised questions about the value of … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...