Church Divas, Big Money and Big Music!

TWO chances to see and hear the inside story on church divas, big money and big music!
Talk with visual presentation by Salvatore Basile, author of  Fifth Avenue Famous: The Extraordinary Story of Music at St. Patrick’s Cathedral,

Monday, November 29, 6:30 p.m.
New York Public Library

Mid-Manhattan Branch
455 Fifth Avenue (at 40th Street)
Talk and book signing
(as part of the exhibition Three Faiths: Judaism, Christianity, Islam)

Monday, December 6, 6:00 p.m.
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts

40 Lincoln Center Plaza
Talk and book signing
FORGOTTEN SHOWBIZ: New York’s Extravagant Sacred Music Scene in the Gilded Age—
And How Tossing Out the Ladies Ended it All (as part of the exhibition Life Upon the Wicked Stage)

For more information on Salvatore Basile and his book, visit his blog . The blog contains ruminations on everything from cookbooks to the publishing process of Fifth Avenue Famous.

TWO chances to see and hear the inside story on church divas, big money and big music! Talk with visual presentation by Salvatore Basile, author of  Fifth Avenue Famous: The Extraordinary Story of Music at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, Monday, November … Full Story

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A Trip to the Bronx Zoo

Last weekend proved to be the perfect weather for a trip to the zoo–the Bronx Zoo, to be precise. Fordham has a strong tie to the zoo–at one time, the land that now comprises the zoo was owned by Fordham, until it was sold to the City of New York with the stipulation that land be used for a zoo and garden. The Bronx Zoo (then known as the New York Zoological Park) officially opened to the public on November 8, 1899 and has since grown to be the United States’ largest metropolitan zoo.

This past weekend, we were treated to both lion cubs AND tiger cubs, as well as a visit to the Mouse House and the Monkey House.

The trees were aflame with color and the entire lion family was enjoying the final warmth of a November afternoon.

One of the new tiger cubs explores his Bronx habitat.

Degus cuddle.

The monkeys were too fast for my camera!

For more on the animals we share our planet with:

In The Animal Therefore I Am, Derrida ponders the distinction, dating back to Descartes, between animals and humans. Derrida pulls apart the idea that thought separates all animals into a broad category of “other” from humans, wondering what his cat is thinking as she follows him into the bathroom each morning. It’s a profound investigation into being and thought, and the nature of rationality.

Last weekend proved to be the perfect weather for a trip to the zoo–the Bronx Zoo, to be precise. Fordham has a strong tie to the zoo–at one time, the land that now comprises the zoo was owned by Fordham, … Full Story

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Happy Birthday, Gettysburg Address!

On this day in 1863, 147 years ago, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address.

His Speech was delivered at the dedication of the National Cemetery, and followed a bloody battle that represented the beginning of the end for the Confederacy: Lincoln began: “Fourscore and seven years ago our fathers brought forth on this continent a new nation, conceived in liberty and dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal.”

To read more about Gettysburg, the American Civil War, and President Abraham Lincoln see our series on The North’s Civil War and Reconstructing America both edited by Paul A. Cimbala, Fordham University.

Lincoln Delivering Gettysburg Address: At the dedication of the National Cemetery at Gettysburg on November 19, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln (center) delivered the now famous Gettysburg Address (photographed by Matthew Brady). (Photo Credit: Bettmann/CORBIS) history.com



“A Grand Terrible Dramma”
From Gettysburg to Petersburg: The Civil War Letters of Charles Wellington Reed
Edited by Eric A. Campbell

The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory
A Lincoln Forum Book
Edited by Harold Holzer, Craig L. Symonds, and Frank J. Williams



Coming out in paperback May 2011 !!!

Lincoln Revisited
New Insights from the Lincoln Forum
Edited by John Y. Simon, Harold Holzer, and Dawn Vogel

On this day in 1863, 147 years ago, President Abraham Lincoln delivered his Gettysburg Address. His Speech was delivered at the dedication of the National Cemetery, and followed a bloody battle that represented the beginning of the end for the … Full Story

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Orthodox Church Honors FUP Series Editors

The co-directors of Fordham’s Orthodox Christian Studies program, George Demacopoulos (left) and Aristotle Papanikolaou, flank Archbishop Demetrios Trakatellis, primate of the Greek Orthodox Church of America, and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew
on Oct. 27, 2009.
Photo by Jon Roemer

George E. Demacopoulos, Ph.D., and Aristotle Papanikolaou, Ph.D., associate professors of theology, were installed as Archons at an Oct. 31 ceremony held at the Archdiocesan Cathedral of the Holy Trinity in Manhattan.

“His All Holiness Bartholomew could not have chosen better in elevating Dr. Demacopoulos and Dr. Papanikolaou as Archons,” said Joseph M. McShane, S.J., president of Fordham. “In their ecumenism, scholarship and devotion to the Ecumenical Patriarch, they represent what is best at Fordham. We celebrate their installation not merely for Telly and George’s sake, but because it represents yet another tie between Fordham and our Orthodox brethren.”

Demacopoulos and Papanikolaou are founding co-directors of Fordham’s Orthodox Christian Studies program, the first of its kind at a major university in the United States. The program includes an interdisciplinary minor in Orthodox Christian Studies; the annual Orthodoxy in America Lecture; and a triennial conference dedicated to a historical and theological analysis of the Orthodox/Catholic rift. The proceedings of the first conference, Orthodox Readings of Augustine, which took place in June of 2007, was published in the Fall of 2008.
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The co-directors of Fordham’s Orthodox Christian Studies program, George Demacopoulos (left) and Aristotle Papanikolaou, flank Archbishop Demetrios Trakatellis, primate of the Greek Orthodox Church of America, and Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew on Oct. 27, 2009. Photo by Jon Roemer George E. … Full Story

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St. Peter's Basilica

St. Peter's Basilica / Photo credit: Akiko Takahashi

Last week I wrote about the Cathedral Choir’s involvement in the Papal audience, which could arguably be called a high point of our Roman excursion from the standpoint of its basic WHAM!-factor. (During the event, a number of us agreed that most Protestants don’t generally get to have that much fun.) As a result of all this enthusiasm, one reader commented, “Sounds as if the Vatican staff is very organized.”

That statement proves that everything is a matter of opinion.

We were scheduled to sing at the official Saturday-afternoon opening Mass of the Festival, at St. Peter’s. More WHAM!-factor. As arranged, we showed up and were led into an entrance off a rear courtyard. (I now understand why people seem surprised to learn that St. Patrick’s has rear entrances. It had never occurred to me that St. Peter’s has back doors. Of course it has. What was I expecting?) Into the choir stalls surrounding one of the two organs. And that’s when the trouble started: As our organist was preparing to open the lid, an usher darted over—“Non toccare! Is . . . broken!” The organ, which had been healthy the day before, had apparently suffered an overnight crack-up. We’d have to sing with the support of St. Peter’s second organ, located about a mile and a half away on the other side of the chancel.

This wasn’t a happy situation (and it was underlined by the usher, who strolled by periodically during the Mass to stare impassively at the choir members—perhaps as a welcoming gesture?). To top it off, we discovered, after the Mass, that the amplification system had pooped out. Or hadn’t been turned on.

An ironic situation: During the entire week-long festival, not one of the musical performances was amplified, and given the superb acoustics of Rome’s churches, none of them needed to be. Except at the largest church in the world, St. Peter’s Basilica.

One of our friends said, “What you could hear, was nice . . . ”

(Oops.)

Written by Salvatore Basile, author of Fifth Avenue Famous: The Extraordinary Story of Music at St. Patrick’s Cathedral.

To read more, visit www.salvatorebasile.com.

Last week I wrote about the Cathedral Choir’s involvement in the Papal audience, which could arguably be called a high point of our Roman excursion from the standpoint of its basic WHAM!-factor. (During the event, a number of us agreed … Full Story

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