Is Judaism inherently racist?

racial_fever Eliza Slavet, author of Racial Fever: Freud and the Jewish Question, wonders about the relationship between race and religion in a recent opinion piece featured on her website. Inspired by a November 7 NY Times article titled  ”Who is a Jew? Court Ruling in Britain Raises Question” Slavet considers the underlying racial ramifications of the Jewish faith:

“For most people, race and religion probably seem like separate matters. But an ongoing legal case in Britain suggests that this is a false dichotomy. State-funded religious schools in Britain may base their admissions policies on students’ faith, but not on their race. However, one of the most salient distinctions between Judaism and Christianity rests upon their distinct understandings of the relationships between faith and race. Christianity is built upon the idea that faith in Christ negates racial and national distinctions; by contrast, Judaism is built upon the identification with Jewish ancestors, particularly those described in the story of Exodus. Anti-racist movements have often invoked Christian notions of universal brotherhood to argue for the rights of all humans, regardless of their ethnic or racial ancestors. While Christian understandings of the irrelevance of race have become the norm in most secular Western societies, the question of who’s a Jew complicates this norm.”

To read the rest of the piece, visit Eliza’s blog

            

 

 Eliza Slavet, author of Racial Fever: Freud and the Jewish Question, wonders about the relationship between race and religion in a recent opinion piece featured on her website. Inspired by a November 7 NY Times article titled  ”Who is a … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...

The Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew on the Charlie Rose Show, November 2

bartholomew The Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, author of Fordham’s In the World, Yet Not of the World, made a rare television appearance on the Charlie Rose Show on November 2.

During the interview, His All Holiness explained his role in the church as leader of 300 million Christians worldwide, as well as discussed the reason for his visit to the United States, his sixth. He participated in the eighth international interfaith and interdisciplinary environmental symposium in New Orleans.  Environmentalism is a cause that is important to Patriarch Bartholomew, as he explains:  “Usually we speak about the education of our children and the good food of our children, but what about the air that they breathe and the water they drink?  Now and tomorrow and after tomorrow we have to think of the coming generations, the posterity.  That is a duty of the church and that is why the Ecumenical
Patriarchate initiated this symposium and environmental activity.”

You can read the entire interview here.

The Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, author of Fordham’s In the World, Yet Not of the World, made a rare television appearance on the Charlie Rose Show on November 2. During the interview, His All Holiness explained his role in the church … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...

The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory

FORDHAM HOLZER COVER

Forthcoming Spring 2010

Harold Holzer, Senior VP for External Affairs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is one of the nation’s leading authorities on Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era. He serves as co-chairman of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Commission, formed to examine Lincoln’s legacy over the course of 1809-2009. The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory is his latest book, forthcoming from Fordham Press in Spring, 2010.

Since October 9, the New York Historical Society has been running an exhibition highlighting New York’s significance in the rise of Abraham Lincoln to political prominence. Lincoln and New York, running through March 25, 2010, chronicles the iconic Westerner’s complicated relationship with the Eastern city, beginning with his first visit in February, 1860, to make a speech at Cooper Union.

Holzer appeared on the CBS Morning Show on Saturday to speak about the exhibit and the importance of New York to Lincoln’s presidential campaign. You can see the interview here.

Holzer has edited several books for Fordham, including:

Lincoln on Democracy
Edited and with a new introduction by Mario C. Cuomo, and Harold Holzer
416 pages
978-0-8232-2345-9, Paper, $24.95

Lincoln Revisited
New Insights from the Lincoln Forum
Edited by John Y. Simon, Harold Holzer, and Dawn Vogel
384 pages, 17 b/w illustrations
978-0-8232-2736-5, Cloth, $29.95
978-0-8232-2738-9, eBook, $21.00

The Lincoln-Douglas Debates

The First Complete, Unexpurgated Text
Edited and with a new introduction by Harold Holzer
394 pages
978-0-8232-2342-8, Paper, $25.00
978-0-8232-2341-1, eBook, $18.00

The Lincoln Forum
Rediscovering Abraham Lincoln
Edited by John Y. Simon, and Harold Holzer
262 pages
978-0-8232-2215-5, Paper, $22.00
978-0-8232-2214-8, Cloth, $55.00

Coming Spring, 2010:

The Lincoln Assassination: Crime and Punishment, Myth and Memory
A Lincoln Forum Book
Edited by Harold Holzer, Craig L. Symonds, and Frank J. Williams
256 pages, 56 b/w illustrations
978-0-8232-3226-0, Cloth, $27.95
978-0-8232-3228-4, eBook, $20.00
The North’s Civil War (series)

Harold Holzer, Senior VP for External Affairs at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, is one of the nation’s leading authorities on Lincoln and the political culture of the Civil War era. He serves as co-chairman of the U.S. Abraham Lincoln … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...

Thinking in Dark Times

fordham

This week’s issue of Publisher’s Weekly features a review of the new collection Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics, forthcoming from Fordham Press in January.

Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics Edited by Roger Berkowitz, Thomas Keenan and Jeffrey Katz. Fordham Univ., $28 (288p) ISBN 978-0-8232-3076-1
Artfully balancing conceptual precision and editorial care with a deep sense of urgency, this volume of essays on one of the 20th century’s great theorists of totalitarianism and anti-Semitism offers a stimulating examination of Arendt’s political and philosophical writings. The pieces analyze the sociopolitical ramifications of her life as well as more focused discussions of key topics in the social and the political realms. Cathy Caruth offers an exemplary reading of the relationship between the Pentagon Papers and Arendt’s notion of the modern political lie that attempts not simply to cover over mistakes but to replace reality entirely by fabricating new histories. Uday Mehta gives a fascinating outline of Arendt’s views on politics and terror, while Christopher Hitchens offers some brief, idiosyncratic reflections on anti-Semitism. Contributors return repeatedly to Arendt’s 1963 coverage of the trial of Nazi official Adolf Eichmann. The essays lack a consensus on Arendt’s notion of the “banality of evil,” but it is precisely the rich variety of interpretations together with a wonderful selection of images from her personal library that make the collection so compelling. (Jan.)

This week’s issue of Publisher’s Weekly features a review of the new collection Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics, forthcoming from Fordham Press in January. Thinking in Dark Times: Hannah Arendt on Ethics and Politics Edited … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...

Library Journal Review: The Rat That Got Away

Library Journal ran a great review of The Rat That Got Away: A Bronx Memoir:

Jones, Allen & Mark Naison. The Rat That Got Away: A Bronx Memoir . Fordham Univ. 2009. c.224p. illus. ISBN 978-0-8232-3102-7. $29.95. AUTOBIOG
Jones pursued two successful careers in Europe: professional basketball player and banker. If you met him, you might not guess he spent his teen years as a heroin dealer in New York. His memoir, written with Naison (history & African American studies, Fordham Univ.) focuses on his experiences growing up in a Bronx public housing project, playing serious basketball, ignoring school, dealing and doing drugs, and eventually lucking into a series of experiences that led to a professional basketball career in Europe. Jones credits his success to his supportive family, coaches, and neighborhood elders, but ultimately his is a tale of luck. The young Jones makes rash decisions, avoids his responsibilities, lies, and steals but also encounters many unlikely second chances. In another writer’s hands, this blessed triumph-over-adversity story line might be trite and irritating, but Jones draws readers in with his direct, conversational style, and the tale is gripping even though readers know it will end well. VERDICT Recommended for memoir lovers and anyone interested in a first-person perspective on 1960s-era urban adolescence. —Emily-Jane Dawson, Multnomah Cty. Lib., Portland, OR

Library Journal ran a great review of The Rat That Got Away: A Bronx Memoir: Jones, Allen & Mark Naison. The Rat That Got Away: A Bronx Memoir . Fordham Univ. 2009. c.224p. illus. ISBN 978-0-8232-3102-7. $29.95. AUTOBIOG Jones pursued … Full Story

Share to Facebook Share to Twitter Share to Twitter Share to Twitter More...