Fordham Press winner of French Voices Grand Prize

Fordham University Press is the recipient of three French Voices Awards including the grand prize for La Nostalgie by Barbara Cassin, translated by Pascale-Anne Brault. The prize amounts to $10,000—$6,000 for the publisher and $4,000 for the translator in addition to his/her fees.

The awards ceremony took place at the French Embassy (a.k.a. the Beaux-Arts Payne Whitney, designed by Stanford White) at 972 Fifth Avenue, across the street from the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Here are some memorable shots from the evening. . .

For a full list of French Voices Grantees, click here.

To donate to THE HELEN MEMORIAL FUND, please click here.

 

 

 

Fordham University Press is the recipient of three French Voices Awards including the grand prize for La Nostalgie by Barbara Cassin, translated by Pascale-Anne Brault. The prize amounts to $10,000—$6,000 for the publisher and $4,000 for the translator in addition to his/her … Full Story

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NYT Interview: Judith Butler on Race

Opinionator | The Stone
What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’?
By GEORGE YANCY and JUDITH BUTLER | JANUARY 12, 2015

This is the fifth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. This week’s conversation is with Judith Butler, Maxine Elliot Professor in the department of comparative literature and the program of critical theory at the University of California, Berkeley. She is the author of numerous influential books, including “Dispossession: The Performative in the Political,” which she co-authored with Athena Athanasiou. She will publish a book on public assemblies with Harvard University Press this year. — George Yancy

READ FULL INTERVIEW. . .

Judith Butler is also the author of Giving An Account of Oneself (Fordham University Press) and her forthcoming book, Senses of the Subject (Fordham University Press) publishes in March 2015.

Opinionator | The Stone What’s Wrong With ‘All Lives Matter’? By GEORGE YANCY and JUDITH BUTLER | JANUARY 12, 2015 This is the fifth in a series of interviews with philosophers on race that I am conducting for The Stone. … Full Story

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The Lure of New York City

In Walking New York: Reflections of American Writers from Walt Whitman to Teju Cole, Stephen Miller talks about how New York has been a magnet city for writers, painters, dancers, musicians, financiers, and tramps. It has also been a magnet city for students from all over the world.

Gao Mengzei, who came from China, recently told a New Yorker reporter: “I knew I wanted to come to New York, and Columbia was the only school in the city I knew the name of.” But her first impression of New York was not a good one. “People always ask ‘What’s your first impression of New York? and they never like my response when I say it’s big fat rats!’”

Stephen Miller is a freelance writer and the author of five books, including Conversation: A History of a Declining Art. His articles on literary, political, and cultural questions have appeared in many journals in the United States and Great Britain, including The American Scholar, The Times Literary Supplement, Partisan Review, and Sewanee Review, among others. He has an M.A. in English from Yale and a Ph.D. in comparative literature from Rutgers.

Read more…‘Over and Out’, The New Yorker, 10/13/14.

In Walking New York: Reflections of American Writers from Walt Whitman to Teju Cole, Stephen Miller talks about how New York has been a magnet city for writers, painters, dancers, musicians, financiers, and tramps. It has also been a magnet … Full Story

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John Lennon’s Billboard Hit ‘Imagine’

Today marks the 34th anniversary of John Lennon’s untimely death. Over three decades ago, Lennon was fatally shot in front of The Dakota building where he lived.  As we pay tribute to this legendary music icon, several of his most memorable songs inevitably come to mind. Among them, his 1971 best-selling single, “Imagine”—arguably one the most revered songs of our time. Why does this song continue to to possess and haunt us after almost 40 years?

In Hits: Philosophy in the Juke Box”, author Peter Szendy analyzes “Imagine” and other popular songs. He probes the ever-growing and ever more global phenomenon of the hit song. The hit song, Szendy concludes functions like a myth, a force of repetition that grows by force of repetition. After reading this book, one can no longer avoid realizing that music is more than a soundtrack: It is the condition of our Lives.

 

Today marks the 34th anniversary of John Lennon’s untimely death. Over three decades ago, Lennon was fatally shot in front of The Dakota building where he lived.  As we pay tribute to this legendary music icon, several of his most … Full Story

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Remembering Pearl Harbor

Dec. 7, 2014 — Today marks the 73rd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor when Japan bombed the U.S. Pacific Fleet anchored in Hawaii.

This “Day of Infamy” was unprovoked and ultimately drew this nation into World War II.

At exactly 7:55 a.m. on Dec. 7, 1941, Japanese torpedoes started ripping open battleships anchored alongside Ford Island. Within two hours, some 20 ships were sunk or damaged and 164 planes destroyed.

Of the 2,400 who died, nearly half were killed in a matter of seconds aboard the giant USS Arizona battleship, when a bomb detonated the ship’s munitions depot, igniting a conflagration that burned for three days.

It was the most devastating foreign attack on U.S. soil until September 11, 2001.

Here are some titles from our series:

The United States and the Second World War: New Perspectives on Diplomacy, War, and Home Front
Edited by G. Kurt Piehler and Sidney Pash

A Pact with Vichy: Angelo Tasca from Italian Socialism to French Collaboration
Emanuel Rota

The Diary of Prisoner 17326: A Boy’s Life in a Japanese Labor Camp
John K. Stutterheim
Foreword by Mark Parillo

The Church of Greece Under Axis Occupation
Panteleymon Anastasakis

5 Facts You Didn’t Know About Pearl Harbor

 

 

 

Dec. 7, 2014 — Today marks the 73rd anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor when Japan bombed the U.S. Pacific Fleet anchored in Hawaii. This “Day of Infamy” was unprovoked and ultimately drew this nation into World War II. … Full Story

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