2015 Yarrow Mamout Archaeology Project

History is continuing to unfold at 3324 Dent Pl. NW. in Washington, D.C.

An archaeological dig has commenced on land that was once owned and occupied by a slave brought from Africa.

Author James H. Johnston has been instrumental in bringing Yarrow Mamout’s story to light. Johnston’s book, From Slave Ship to Harvard is the true story of an African American family in Maryland over six generations. Johnston has reconstructed a unique narrative of black struggle and achievement from paintings, photographs, books, diaries, court records, legal documents, and oral histories.

From Slave Ship to Harvard traces the family from the colonial period and the American Revolution through the Civil War to Harvard and finally today, where Mamout’s story continues.

#ReadUP

History is continuing to unfold at 3324 Dent Pl. NW. in Washington, D.C. An archaeological dig has commenced on land that was once owned and occupied by a slave brought from Africa. Author James H. Johnston has been instrumental in … Full Story

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Gay Fathers & Their Children

You know the old adage: First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes the baby in the baby carriage. Given SCOTUS’s ruling in favor of same-sex marriage, it seems appropriate that gay fatherhood is the next thing on many Americans’ minds.

Author and anthropologist Aaron Goodfellow dives into the issue with Gay Fathers, Their Children, and the Making of Kinship. His work began all the way back in 1995 while he was brainstorming for his masters dissertation. “I was spending a lot of time in Central Park because I had a big dog, and I met two men who had just adopted a child,” Goodfellow remembers. “I thought, ‘Wow, this is fantastic.’” Add to the mix the late-in-life realization that his own deceased father had been gay, and the study slowly developed into something “intensely personal and autobiographical.”

Fast-forward 20 years and 35 families later, and Goodfellow now presents what he calls a “very traditional, almost old-school anthropological study” on the differences between gay fatherhood and normative heterosexual parenthood. The families featured in the book—many of whom were found via Provincetown Family Weekend’s participant database—represent most of the mid-Atlantic coast, including Long Island and New York City.

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Posted by NextMagazine on 6/18/15

#ReadUP #PRIDE #MarriageEquality #Lovewins

You know the old adage: First comes love, then comes marriage, then comes the baby in the baby carriage. Given SCOTUS’s ruling in favor of same-sex marriage, it seems appropriate that gay fatherhood is the next thing on many Americans’ … Full Story

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On Earth as in Heaven Cited in Pope Francis’ Encyclical

Pope Francis issued his long-awaited encyclical on the environment Thursday, calling the world on the carpet for not doing enough to halt climate change. On Earth as in Heaven: Ecological Vision and Initiatives of Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, edited by John Chryssavgis, was cited in Pope’s encyclical:

Patriarch Bartholomew has spoken in particular of the need for each of us to repent of the ways we have harmed the planet, for “inasmuch as we all generate small ecological damage”, we are called to acknowledge “our contribution, smaller or greater, to the disfigurement and destruction of creation”. He has repeatedly stated this firmly and persuasively, challenging us to acknowledge our sins against creation: “For human beings… to destroy the biological diversity of God’s creation; for human beings to degrade the integrity of the earth by causing changes in its climate, by stripping the earth of its natural forests or destroying its wetlands; for human beings to contaminate the earth’s waters, its land, its air, and its life – these are sins”. For “to commit a crime against the natural world is a sin against ourselves and a sin against God.” [15-16]

Read more of Pope Francis’ encyclical. . .

Citation: [15-16] Address in Santa Barbara, California (8 November 1997); cf. John Chryssavgis, On Earth as in Heaven: Ecological Vision and Initiatives of Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, Bronx, New York, 2012.

Learn more about The Orthodox Christian Studies Center – Fordham University.

Pope Francis issued his long-awaited encyclical on the environment Thursday, calling the world on the carpet for not doing enough to halt climate change. On Earth as in Heaven: Ecological Vision and Initiatives of Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew, edited by John … Full Story

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2014-2015 POL Prize Winners

We’re pleased to announce that Gregory Mahrer of Sebastopol, California is the winner of the POL Prize, selected by John Yau for A Provisional Map of the Lost Continent. Nancy K. Pearson of Frederick, Maryland is the winner of the Editor’s Prize for The Whole by Contemplation of a Single Bone. Their manuscripts will be published by Fordham University Press in Spring 2016.

Gregory Mahrer‘s work has been published in The New England Review, The Indiana Review, Green Mountains Review, Volt, Colorado Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review and elsewhere, as well as on the web sites Poetry Daily and Verse Daily. Several of his poems have been nominated for Pushcart Prizes. In 2014 one of those poems, “Refrain,” received a Puschart Special Mention. He lives and works in rural Northern California and Baja California Sur, Mexico.

Nancy K. Pearson’s first book of poems,Two Minutes of Light (Perugia Press, 2008), won a 2009 L.L. Winship/ PEN New England Award and was a 9th Annual Massachusetts Book Awards “Must Read Book.” Her work has been published in The Iowa Review, Oberon Poetry Magazine, and Alaska Quarterly Review among other publications. Winner of the 2014-2015 Inprint Donald Barthelme Prize in Poetry and Pushcart Prize nominee, Pearson has been a guest lecturer at Harvard University and is currently an Instructor at the University of Houston.

 

Finalists were:

J.L. Conrad, A World In Which
Purvi Shah, Miracle Marks
Jennifer Willoughby, Beautiful Zero
Michael Snediker, The New York Editions

Read more to find out who the Semi-finalists were…

We’re pleased to announce that Gregory Mahrer of Sebastopol, California is the winner of the POL Prize, selected by John Yau for A Provisional Map of the Lost Continent. Nancy K. Pearson of Frederick, Maryland is the winner of the … Full Story

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TLS Review: How to Be an Intellectual

 

How to Be an Intellectual has received a glowing review in the latest issue of the Times Literary Supplement: 

“In his final and most vivid chapter, Williams combines the personal and the critical. He writes a riveting and heartfelt tribute to his former teacher, Michael Sprinker, a brawny, brusque and brilliant professor of English and Comparative Literature, who came from a working-class background, and whose teaching was unstinting in its energy and left no soul untouched. It is here that Williams, also humorously tells the story of his own career and previous jobs – in a prison, in a second-hand bookstore, and as editor of the Minnesota Review. Out of such experiences comes his much-needed attack on academic-speak: terms such as “problematic” are “just clunky”, he writes; why not say “troublesome” or “contradictory” if that is what you mean? His editing advice should be compulsory reading at universities – academics and journalists can learn from each other. Jeffrey Williams beats the drum for critics to become public intellectuals who address injustice and contribute to society. And he leads by example.”—Marina Gerner, Times Literary Supplement, 22nd May 2015

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  How to Be an Intellectual has received a glowing review in the latest issue of the Times Literary Supplement:  “In his final and most vivid chapter, Williams combines the personal and the critical. He writes a riveting and heartfelt tribute to … Full Story

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