Regis H.S. Ranked Among Top 50 Smartest Private Schools in U.S.

The only private, all-scholarship school in the US, tuition is free for Regis students — if they can get in. The all-boys school abides by a competitive admissions process and accepts only incoming freshman, no transfers. During their time at Regis, students receive individualized college counseling and a top-notch education.——Business Insider (Read More)

Teach Me to Be Generous tells the remarkable story of Regis High School, the Jesuit school on New York’s Upper East Side that was founded in 1914 by an anonymous donor as a school for Catholic boys whose families could not otherwise afford a Catholic education. Enabled by the philanthropy of the founding family for nearly a century, and now by alumni and friends carrying on that tradition of generosity, Regis has been able to provide tuition-free, all-scholarship education for its entire history. It also holds the distinction of being the first free-standing Jesuit high school in the United States, with no connection to any Jesuit colleges or universities.

Regis High School’s unique story is told by an engaging storyteller and historian who has taught at the school for more than ten years. Father Andreassi offers captivating glimpses into the lives and daily experiences of Regis’s students and faculty while chronicling the development of the school’s educational philosophy and spiritual approach in its first century. Filled with entertaining anecdotes alongside wider historical context and illuminating statistical analysis, Teach Me to Be Generous tracks Regis High School through the decades of the twentieth century to the present day—from the generosity of a devout Catholic widow, through the Depression and World War II, to changes in demographics of the Catholic community and shifts in the landscape of Catholic education in New York City. During the school’s first few decades, Regis admitted thousands of Catholic boys, mostly from poor or lower-middle-class families, helping prepare them for success in college and leadership positions in the professions. Because of the closing of dozens of urban Catholic schools and the general decline of the quality of New York City’s public schools, in more recent years the school has faced the challenge of remaining true to its mission in offering an education to Catholic boys “who otherwise would not be able to afford a Catholic education.”

Teach Me to Be Generous paints a vivid portrait of the first one hundred years of an exceptional institution and looks with hope and confidence to its future.

Read More on the 50 smartest private high schools in the U.S.

The only private, all-scholarship school in the US, tuition is free for Regis students — if they can get in. The all-boys school abides by a competitive admissions process and accepts only incoming freshman, no transfers. During their time at Regis, students … Full Story

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LA Review of Books Interviews Judith Butler

LA Review of Books
Arne De Boever interviews Judith Butler
March 23, 2015

Demonstrating Precarity: Vulnerability, Embodiment, and Resistance

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LA Review of Books Arne De Boever interviews Judith Butler March 23, 2015 Demonstrating Precarity: Vulnerability, Embodiment, and Resistance See full Interview

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Winner of the John Nicholas Brown Prize

The Medieval Academy of America has announced that Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500, by Karl Shoemaker is the winner of the 2015 John Nicholas Brown Prize!

Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500 traces convincingly, with nuance and acuity, the institution of sanctuary for well over a thousand years—from late pagan Rome to Henry VIII. He successfully challenges the prevailing assumption that sanctuary was primarily a necessary societal response to weak political order, as well as the erroneous impression that its demise in early modern England reflected the era’s anti-papism. Shoemaker’s sweeping overview is richly embellished with engaging narrative detail and provides an original, compelling, and above all convincing account of the evolution of criminal justice in the Western legal tradition over the entire medieval period.

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The Medieval Academy of America has announced that Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500, by Karl Shoemaker is the winner of the 2015 John Nicholas Brown Prize! Sanctuary and Crime in the Middle Ages, 400-1500 traces convincingly, with … Full Story

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Dublin Review of Books: The Sons of Molly Maguire

‘THEM POOR IRISH LADS’ IN PENNSYLVANIA
Breandán Mac Suibhne

The Sons of Molly Maguire: The Irish Roots of America’s First Labor War, by Mark Bulik,Fordham University Press, 352 pp, ISBN 978-0823262236

Indade I do, sir. Will I ever forget it! A sad day it was in the hard coalfields, sir. When the hour of the hangings arrived for them poor Irish lads, the world suddenly became dark and we had to burn our lamps. It’s Black Thursday it was, sir.

The response of an elderly miner’s widow in Pennsylvania, when asked by folklorist George Korson in the 1930s if she remembered the hanging of the first batch of Molly Maguires in June 1877.

… among the McGeehan clan in County Donegal, the story is still recounted of the family’s gathering around the kitchen table on that day in 1877. Hugh McGeehan had written them of his innocence and asked them to pray for him. And, so the story

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‘THEM POOR IRISH LADS’ IN PENNSYLVANIA Breandán Mac Suibhne The Sons of Molly Maguire: The Irish Roots of America’s First Labor War, by Mark Bulik,Fordham University Press, 352 pp, ISBN 978-0823262236 Indade I do, sir. Will I ever forget it! … Full Story

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After Fukushima

Today marks the 4th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Following a major earthquake, a 15-meter tsunami disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. All three cores largely melted in the first three days.

In After Fukushima: The Equivalence of Catastrophes, the philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy examines the nature of catastrophes in the era of globalization and technology. Can a catastrophe be an isolated occurrence? Is there such a thing as a “natural” catastrophe when all of our technologies—nuclear energy, power supply, water supply—are necessarily implicated, drawing together the biological, social, economic, and political? Nancy examines these questions and more. Exclusive to this English edition are two interviews with Nancy conducted by Danielle Cohen-Levinas and Yuji Nishiyama and Yotetsu Tonaki.

Visit DigitalResearch@Fordham to download the Table of Contents and Introduction to After Fukushima: The Equivalence of Catastrophes.

Today marks the 4th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster. Following a major earthquake, a 15-meter tsunami disabled the power supply and cooling of three Fukushima Daiichi reactors, causing a nuclear accident on March 11, 2011. All three cores … Full Story

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