Dorothy Day’s New Step Towards Canonization

On April 19th, the Archdiocese of New York released a press release regarding an update in Dorothy Day’s progress towards possible sainthood.  The Catholic Worker founder, who was named a “Servant of God” back in 2000 when the Vatican opened up the canonization process, is now under consideration to be elevated from “Servant of God” to “Venerable.”

Cardinal Timothy Dolan, the Archbishop of New York will be putting together a team to read and analyze Dorothy Day’s writings in order to discover if she truly led a life of”heroic virtue.”  This will include analyzing about 3,000 pages of articles published in The Catholic Worker, as well as pages from her books and manuscripts.  In total, it is expected that over 8,000 pages of Dorothy Day’s work will be examined in order to raise her to “Venerable” and begin to lead towards beatification and canonization.  The team will also begin interviewing people who have worked with Dorothy Day and knew her personally in order to better know her impact and learn more about her life from primary sources.

On May 3rd, Fordham University Press will be launching a book called Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker: The Miracle of Our Continuance.  It is a portrait of Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker movement in New York City through photographs taken in 1955 by Vivian Cherry, a documentary photographer, accompanied by excerpts of Dorothy Day’s writings selected and edited by her granddaughter, Kate Hennessy.  The book launch will take place at Fordham University’s Lincoln Center campus in New York City at 6:00 pm.  You can find a flier for the event here.  If you would like to attend, please be sure to RSVP here.

For Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker: The Miracle of Our Continuance and related titles, please check out Fordham Press’ website.  Between the beautiful words of Dorothy Day, the inspiring introduction from her granddaughter Kate Hennessy, and the breathtaking photographs by Vivian Cherry, we are sure you won’t be disappointed with this read!

On April 19th, the Archdiocese of New York released a press release regarding an update in Dorothy Day’s progress towards possible sainthood. The Catholic Worker founder, who was named a “Servant of God” back in 2000 when the Vatican opened up the canonization process, is now under consideration to be elevated from “Servant of God” to “Venerable.” Full Story

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The Death of the Bard: April 23rd, 1616

Today marks the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare, one of, if not the most, famous writer in Elizabethan England.  Shakespeare died on April 23rd, 1616 in Stratford-Upon-Avon, England, the same town in which he was born, coincidentally on April 23rd, 1564 .  The cause of his death remains a mystery; however, to die at age 52 in the 17th century was much longer than the average life span, which was about 35 years old.  He is currently buried in Holy Trinity Church, the same church in which he was baptized.

The Bard has been called the “Soule of the Age! The applause! delight! the wonder of our Stage!” by his contemporary, Ben Jonson in Shakespeare’s first printed foglio of his collected works, known as Shakespeare’s First Foglio.  It is no secret that Shakespeare is incredibly well-known and has had an incredible impact on literature and life today.  Most people have had to read at least one of his plays in high school, whether it have been Romeo & Juliet, Hamlet, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, or Macbeth.  He is the writer of 154 sonnets and 37 plays, which have influenced countless writers during his life and since his death.

In fact, in Fordham University Press’s Spring 2016 Catalog alone, we have published two different works that deal with Shakespeare, his contemporaries, and his world: Shakespeare as a Way of Life: Skeptical Practice and the Politics of Weakness by James Kuzner and This Distracted Globe: Worldmaking in
Early Modern Literature
edited by Marcie Frank, Jonathan Goldberg, and Karen Newman.

Shakespeare as a Way of Life shows how reading Shakespeare helps us to live with epistemological weakness and even to practice this weakness, to make it a way of life. In a series of close readings, Kuzner shows how Hamlet, Lucrece, Othello, The Winter’s Tale, The Tempest, and Timon of Athens, impel us to grapple with basic uncertainties: how we can be free, whether the world is abundant, whether we have met the demands of love and social life.

The essays in This Distracted Globe investigate the material stuff of the world in Spenser, Cary, and Marlowe; the sociable bonds of authorship, sexuality, and sovereignty in Shakespeare and others; and the universal status of spirit, gender, and empire in the worlds of Vaughan, Donne, and the dastan (tale) of Chouboli, a Rajasthani princess. Together, these essays make the case that to address what it takes to create a world in the early modern period requires the kinds of thinking exemplified by theory.

Still 400 years later, scholars, professors, students, and society in general are still interested in stepping into Shakespeare’s world and being captured by the magic of his plays and the beauty of his poetry and prose.  We even use his language in our daily speech, being that Shakespeare coined the phrases “the green-eyed monster,” “gossip” and “heart of gold,” among others. 

It is quite probable that the mark that Shakespeare has left on our world will never be erased, for after the Bard is gone, his writings live on.  If you wish to read more about William Shakespeare and Elizabethan England, take a look at Fordham Press’ Renaissance Studies titles.  Happy reading, and remember, all the world’s a stage!

Today marks the 400th anniversary of William Shakespeare, one of, if not the most, famous writer in Elizabethan England. Shakespeare died on April 23rd, 1616 in Stratford-Upon-Avon, England, the same town in which he was born, coincidentally on April 23rd, 1564 . The cause of his death remains a mystery; however, to die at age 52 in the 17th century was much longer than the average life span, which was about 35 years old. He is currently buried in Holy Trinity Church, the same church in which he was baptized. Full Story

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Huffington Post Interview: Nicolas Hundley of The Revolver in the Hive

In 2013, Fordham University Press published The Revolver in the Hivethe first book of poetry written by Nicolas Hundley.  Hundley’s work won the Poets Out Loud Editor’s Prize in 2012, and in addition, he has had multiple poems featured in Green Mountain Review, Massachusetts Review, and Conduit, to name a few.  He was recently interviewed by Jonathan Hobratsch, an English professor and a poetry editor, for HuffPost Books about his writing style, inspirations, and what he is currently working on now.

Hundley talks a bit in the interview about his writing and editing process.  He says the following in response to Hobratsch’s request, “Tell us about your writing and editing methods.”

I write first drafts in notebooks, normally during lunch breaks. I have several haunts near my office, including various libraries and cafes. Having a time constraint is beneficial for me, as I’m forced to get as much down as I can without being self-conscious.

Then, I transcribe and revise during weekends and evenings. Afterward, I stick them in a drawer or folder and try to forget them. Months later, when I can look at them afresh, I go back to the notebook to expand or pursue different directions. Typically, my poems undergo several revisions and drafts. Some arrive after only one draft, but those are rare.

Hundley ends the interview by explaining where he draws inspiration from.  He says:

Beyond fiction and poetry, I get inspiration from film, music, and visual art. Though, I don’t often directly respond to particular paintings or songs, for instance, in my poems. Rather, I respond to them by evoking their mood or logic.

My writing is more likely drawn directly from everyday experience—even what some might consider “unglamorous” aspects, like work. I’ve held various jobs in state government, where I’ve been exposed to a good amount of bureaucracy and bureaucratic language. Over time, I’ve become fascinated with bureaucratic language—its jargon, ambiguity, and clinical voice—and the unintentional beauty that it occasionally produces. I’m intrigued by the thought that any experience or language can be incorporated into a poem.

To read Hundley’s interview in its entirety, you can find it here.

Please check out The Revolver in the Hive by Nicolas Hundley and other books like it at Fordham Press’ website.  We are sure you won’t be able to put it down!

In 2013, Fordham University Press published The Revolver in the Hive, the first book of poetry written by Nicolas Hundley. Hundley’s work won the Poets Out Loud Editor’s Prize in 2012, and in addition, he has had multiple poems featured in Green Mountain Review, Massachusetts Review, and Conduit, to name a few. He was recently interviewed by Jonathan Hobratsch, an English professor and a poetry editor, for HuffPost Books about his writing style, inspirations, and what he is currently working on now. Full Story

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Jeffrey Sacks’ Iterations of Loss Wins Harry Levin Prize by ACLA

Jeffrey Sacks, associate professor and director of Arabic Studies at the University of California, Riverside, is also the author of “Iterations of Loss: Mutilation and Aesthetic Form, al-Shidyaq to Darwish,” which was published in Spring 2015.  This is his first published book, and he is now being awarded the Harry Levin Prize for his “series of sensitive, evocative readings of Arabic and Arab Jewish texts from the 19th century to the present day.”

According to UCR Today, “the prize, established in 1985, is named for the late Harry T. Levin, an American literary critic and Harvard University scholar of modernism and comparative literature. Sacks is a co-winner of the 2016 prize with Brown University’s Tamara T. Chin, and accepted the award at the ACLA meeting in Boston March 17-20.”  It is awarded to scholars for outstanding first books in Comparative Literature by the American Comparative Literature Association (ACLA).

Iterations of Loss addresses nineteenth through twenty-first century Arabic and Arab Jewish writing (Mahmoud Darwish, Ahmad Faris al-Shidyaq, Elias Khoury, Edmond Amran El Maleh, Shimon Ballas, and Taha Husayn), showing that language interrupts is domestication into the forms of temporal and aesthetic coherency privileged in the monolingual state in West Asia.

We at Fordham University Press are so glad to have Jeffrey Sacks on our team and are so proud of his dedication to his field and his incredible work.  This first book is just the beginning!

Jeffrey Sacks, associate professor and director of Arabic Studies at the University of California, Riverside, is also the author of “Iterations of Loss: Mutilation and Aesthetic Form, al-Shidyaq to Darwish,” which was published in Spring 2015. This was his first published book, and he is now being awarded the Harry Levin Prize for his “series of sensitive, evocative readings of Arabic and Arab Jewish texts from the 19th century to the present day.” Full Story

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A Word From Our Sponsor Wins the 2016 Broadcast Historian Award

Cynthia B. Meyers, Associate Professor of Communication at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, is being recognized for her book, A Word from Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising and the Golden Age of Radio, published in Fall 2013.

On April 18th at the Broadcast Education Association’s annual convention in Las Vegas, she will be awarded the 2016 Broadcast Historian Award along with a $5,000 check from the Library of American Broadcasting Foundation (LABF).  According to the Broadcast Education Association’s website, this award goes to “an educator who has published or produced work specifically related to broadcast history.” 

A Word From Our Sponsor describes how admen, advertising agencies, and sponsors shaped U.S. radio into a commercial entertainment medium from the late 1920s until the early 1950s. It views the development of twentieth-century popular culture through the lens of the advertising and broadcasting industries and examines the intersection of commerce and culture in American mass media.

Congratulations, Cynthia B. Meyers, for this wonderful recognition.
We are so proud to have you as a part of our Fordham Press family.

Cynthia B. Meyers, Associate Professor of Communication at the College of Mount Saint Vincent, is being recognized for her book, A Word from Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising and the Golden Age of Radio, published in Fall 2013. Full Story

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